Tag Archives: Buddhism

I’m here


It’s the morning again; my favorite time to write poetry

My wife lay asleep across the room on our bed

Although things have been hard, I am optimistic

I’ve shown myself a better path, so my walk is easier

At least in the now; that fact remains

I have to continue to be mindful of the future

And live present in each moment; one after the next

I take a deep breath and ground myself; I’m alive

I remember an anxious moment yesterday

And knowing that to live is to suffer

But that thought passed; as all thoughts and moments do

I close my eyes; to simply shut them. 

Makes me calm. Collected. Present.

And I take another breath.

Where I’m going doesn’t matter; now is time

I can build towards anything; but nothing is promised

So I do not attach myself with the future

I shall cut my ties with worry and sorrow

In this pitch black sky; I am here

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Tea . A Zen Story; rewritten by Nina

A Buddhist monk who studied and meditated on the teachings of Buddha for over a decade wanted to speak with an enlightened one who dwelled alone in a small temple high in the mountains. He prepared for his journey eager to hear his teaching. After 7 days of rigorous hiking he reached the temple.

The master greeted him and welcomed him inside. The master put some tea on to boil and they sat in silence. The monk became very eager and unsettled in not hearing his teaching. The master poured the tea and sat with the monk. The monk didn’t drink his tea and began questioning his master of Buddha.

The master replied.. “You have studied Buddhism for 20 years and can not simply enjoy this cup of tea?” The monk wept…. as another step to enlightenment lay under his feet….

Nina

Source: Tea . A Zen Story; rewritten by – Nina

What you do not.

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Instead of what you need; what about what you do not?

In a world of depressive materialism; poverty and pollution

I dont intent to tread on trend; pretenders I severed an end

Theres a fine line drawn in the sand; trampled

Without mindful intent; a spiritual glance

What is the zen and the trance; compassion enhanced

And when does my third eye open; to notice what controls my emotions

Carefully ponder; what I do and what I do not need

Eat, sleep and breathe

Clothing and shelter and ease

Calming peace and honourable deeds

No harm. No foul.

What I do. And what I do not need.

 

-Nina

 

 

Appearances via GreatMiddleWay

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The images we see on a mirror are reflections, but they lack substance. In the same way, conventional phenomena arise from (and in) the basis-of-all, but they are not ultimately real.

If the mirror is dirty or warped, the reflections will be dull or distorted. Similarly, some of our perceptions can be more valid (clear) than others.

Appearances are false: insubstantial, impermanent, and dependent on multiple causes and conditions. And yet, they arise continuously.

Source: Appearances

Karma and Blame – The Great Middle Way

Assigning blame is emotionally charged. Whether we assign blame to others or ourselves, the negative emotion that accompanies blame is unskillful.

Blame entails not only assigning responsibility for an unwelcome consequence, but also imputing malice or evil intent to the one performing the act.

The law of karma, as taught by the Buddha Shakyamuni, lies beyond all concepts of human morality, right and wrong, good and evil. It is merely the understanding that causes produce effects. Gravity does not intend for us to fall and hurt ourselves when we trip; fire does not intend to cause us pain when our skin is burned by a flame.

When water comes in contact with a surface, that surface becomes wet. We do not blame the water for making the surface wet –that is its nature. Similarly, when our wrong views (ignorance of the nature of self and all phenomena) and afflicted emotions (attachment, aversion, and indifference) lead us to act in unskillful ways, there is no question of guilt and blame.

The purpose of acknowledging the law of karma is instructive, not punitive. When we understand that there is a relationship of cause and effect between our actions and the consequences we experience, we are liberated from victimhood. We are no longer subject to a random universe where evil befalls us without rhyme or reason. We are free to make our own way.

We do not study the law of karma to learn the specific reasons ‘why’ something happens. That exercise is futile. We understand the law of karma in order to make the determination to place positive, skillful causes in the continuum of our experience from here onwards.

The law of karma, of cause and effect, is not meant to lead us to recrimination, guilt, and blame. On the contrary, it is the acceptance of our capacity to be free from suffering and the causes of suffering, and embrace happiness and the causes of happiness.

Source: Karma and Blame